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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:17 am 
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MtnKaraoke wrote:
First, the article linked is from 2012 and it is predicting the decline 5 years out.

Second, the article refers to karaoke bars. I believe that is tough to quantify because it seems to ignore the part of the industry that is independent, mobile operators that provide service to regular venues that don't qualify as "karaoke bars".

The Lone Ranger wrote:
Annual sales of Karaoke equipment and software has plunged 80% from 2003 when 200 million dollars in sales was recorded to 40 million dollars today. It might even be less since the data is a couple of years old."


I would like to know what qualifies as karaoke "equipment" and how much of the sales consisted of software. It would seem logical that with the advent of internet karaoke sites and apps (Smule - anyone else getting requests for songs that are available there, but not anywhere else?) that equipment sales have declined.

Pro's don't buy karaoke "equipment" and the consumer can obviously use their own computer.

There's one thing that will always upstage (pun intended) home karaoke and keep people coming out and seeking quality shows.

The one thing that you can't replicate at home is the live audience.

Sure, you can get your friends together in your living room and have a little fun, but that is not the same as performing live, in front of a crowd that truly wants to be entertained.

On the list of factors (mrscott) in a previous post, that one jumped out at me.

I don't believe the study that is linked understands the priority in the mindset of the karaoke singer.

These people want to go out and sing karaoke.

Give them a good show and a consistent experience (considering the aforementioned list of factors) and they will come back.

I have empathy for the OP's situation, but I believe from what I read that there were a number of negative factors that were severe and unpredictable that resulted in this regrettable outcome. I wish you (mrscott) the best as you move into the next chapter...


8) Where to start Mtn? This report was meant to be a guide as to where the karaoke industry was headed. As was mentioned karaoke hit it's peak in 2003, that is when it reached the pinnacle of it's economic market life cycle. Five years later we had the big down turn in the economy and there was a 5 year period of contraction of on average 5% a year. While it is true that karaoke bars aren't the entire market for karaoke hosting, I would say they make up the bulk of the venues that hire hosts on a regular basis. There are of course private parties and weddings not to mention non-profit organizations. The non-profit organizations such as the American Legion, VFW, Elks, Moose and Eagles, however, run their operations very similar to karaoke bars, I would think the same market dynamics apply.

The sale of karaoke equipment and software are merely indicators of public interest in karaoke. Since sales have declined by 80% even though the overall population has increased, I would think this would indicate that interest in karaoke has waned and been replaced by other forms of entertainment. While it is true karaoke pros don't buy karaoke equipment they are still a very small part of the overall karaoke sales market. Couple this with most domestic production of new karaoke music has halted, since the profit margin is no longer there, and you see a picture of an industry in the decline stage of it's market life cycle, at least in the U.S.

This of course doesn't mean that a host such as yourself with a quality product can't be successful. All it means is it's harder to continue to compete with other forms of entertainment. There are still bands even though they are not as popular as they once were, there are still dj's, and many more activities. They are all going after, however, the same economic entertainment pie and the karaoke slice is getting smaller. The pressure is on if you are serious about trying to make hosting your sole source of income.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:31 am 
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Quote:
The one thing that you can't replicate at home is the live audience.


This so true..
Sunday night (11/05) I was lucky to be able to perform "Stand Up" in Hollywood, at "The Improv" comedy club.

Attachment:
improv.jpg
improv.jpg [ 143.2 KiB | Viewed 298 times ]


My daughter thought it would be a hoot, and made the first call to the club, then telling me about it.
I thought, "Why Not", might be fun.

The process involves several meetings with a professional comic, writing an act, and practicing stage technique. (I got this)

So Sunday comes, and the entire family shows up, full house also.
Even with the practice, I felt it would be so-so, and I was apprehensive.

The live audience made all the difference. What an adrenaline rush that audience gave me.
We had 15 from my class that made the cut, and all were on top of the world.
Highly recommended..

We mods are not supposed to advertise, so I'll not post a link to the stand-up comedy workshop.
(Wink wink, nudge, nudge)


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 8:53 am 
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There's a big difference between something that had it's "peak" sometime in the past, and saying that it's dying. Again, I contend that it went from being a novelty market to being the mature market we are in now, where the long-term realities of attendance and KJ wages will be pretty much level into the foreseeable future, NOT in constant decline.

Electronics sales "peaked" in the past. Margins are now slimmer than ever and the manufacturers and retail outlets are making less money. That doesn't mean electronics are dying.

Music and movies hit their peak in the CD/DVD era. Their margins are now way down and they are dealing with many of the same ails as karaoke, trying to navigate how to best make money in a digital, easily pirated era that isn't going anywhere. It doesn't mean music and movies are dying.

The US automobile industry peaked in the 60s and 70s. They then had to adapt to new realities of overseas competition and now have lower margins than ever. Automobiles are not dying.

Snuggies peaked in the past, Nike shoes peaked in the past, Bell-bottoms peaked in the past, sewing machines peaked in the past, macro-brewed beer peaked in the past, airline travel peaked in the past, the USPS peaked in the past, organized religion peaked in the past......it doesn't mean any of these things are dying, at least not in our lifetime, they've just leveled off.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 10:46 am 
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Alan B wrote:
Just like the singer who has to bring his or her drink up on stage with them and then moving around and spilling it all over the place. I mean, c'mon... you can't leave it at the table and be without it for 3 minutes. Again, no respect.


I'm with you on the smoking part, but not on this part. I always advise people to never leave their drink unattended, because that's how people get slipped things.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:27 am 
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TopherM wrote:
There's a big difference between something that had it's "peak" sometime in the past, and saying that it's dying. Again, I contend that it went from being a novelty market to being the mature market we are in now, where the long-term realities of attendance and KJ wages will be pretty much level into the foreseeable future, NOT in constant decline.

Electronics sales "peaked" in the past. Margins are now slimmer than ever and the manufacturers and retail outlets are making less money. That doesn't mean electronics are dying.

Music and movies hit their peak in the CD/DVD era. Their margins are now way down and they are dealing with many of the same ails as karaoke, trying to navigate how to best make money in a digital, easily pirated era that isn't going anywhere. It doesn't mean music and movies are dying.

The US automobile industry peaked in the 60s and 70s. They then had to adapt to new realities of overseas competition and now have lower margins than ever. Automobiles are not dying.

Snuggies peaked in the past, Nike shoes peaked in the past, Bell-bottoms peaked in the past, sewing machines peaked in the past, macro-brewed beer peaked in the past, airline travel peaked in the past, the USPS peaked in the past, organized religion peaked in the past......it doesn't mean any of these things are dying, at least not in our lifetime, they've just leveled off.



8) I didn't say that karaoke was dead, just that it peaked in it's market life cycle, and has been in a state of decline since that point was reached. There will still be karaoke and hosts and bars, but the trend is on the down side. There are still bands and DJ's not to mention jukeboxes etc.etc.etc. I think you will have to admit it is tougher out there building up a karaoke service business, than it was in the past, also the profit margins have been squeezed. Karaoke as part of the economy is currently .01% and growth is projected at nearly 2% in the general economy, for next few years, which means it will even be a smaller part of the total economy. That is why at the host level maintaining your market share is vital.

P.S. You must also remember that when the economic downturn happened for five years after that karaoke declined 5% a year, for a total of a quarter of the former market was taken off the board. That loss has never been made up, and still the projection is that growth will be below the rest of the economy at least until 2022.


Last edited by The Lone Ranger on Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:56 am 
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The Lone Ranger wrote:
...While it is true that karaoke bars aren't the entire market for karaoke hosting, I would say they make up the bulk of the venues that hire hosts on a regular basis.


There are "karaoke bars" and there are regular bars that hire entertainment. The article linked does not differentiate. I'm not making any assumptions here, but I am not certain that this 5 year old report addresses that particular point.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
There are of course private parties and weddings not to mention non-profit organizations. The non-profit organizations such as the American Legion, VFW, Elks, Moose and Eagles, however, run their operations very similar to karaoke bars, I would think the same market dynamics apply.


Well, again, I don't see how this report accounts for private parties and weddings. The report is relating info about "karaoke bars", not private functions and it does not mention the NPO's. It would be silly to assume any of those would be considered "karaoke bars" even for the basis of this study. Non-profit clubs and for-profit bars are simply not the same and the "market dynamics" have both subtle and overt differences that make lumping them in together problematic when drawing conclusions.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
The sale of karaoke equipment and software are merely indicators of public interest in karaoke.


I don't believe that "karaoke equipment" sales are indicative of anything, with the exception of indicating that the equipment is obsolete. They aren't selling VCR's anymore either, but they haven't stopped providing video rental to the home consumer. For example, the app Smule has over 100 MILLION installs. How many do you think it had in 2012?

The Lone Ranger wrote:
Since sales have declined by 80% even though the overall population has increased, I would think this would indicate that interest in karaoke has waned and been replaced by other forms of entertainment.


I would think that you're aging out and tech-inhibited. I don't mean that as an insult, I'm merely pointing out the factors engaged in analyzing this trend are no longer the correct basis upon which to gauge interest in karaoke. Do a google search for the top 10 karaoke apps and you'll find a user-base in the hundreds of millions. This stuff simply didn't exist in 2012.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
While it is true karaoke pros don't buy karaoke equipment they are still a very small part of the overall karaoke sales market.


Which would largely indicate that karaoke "Pros" aren't an effective group upon which to base this trend... "equipment" sales are in decline, but the Pros don't buy that stuff so they don't effect the market one way or the other. The very definition of a moot point.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
Couple this with most domestic production of new karaoke music has halted, since the profit margin is no longer there, and you see a picture of an industry in the decline stage of it's market life cycle, at least in the U.S.


Remember, the consumer doesn't have the limitation that a Pro has. They can (and do) source their music from just about anywhere. They are not concerned with legitimacy, or boundaries/borders or even catering to a widely varied audience. They are only concerned with getting the song they want and don't have to worry about producing a show or offering services. The reality is that regardless of the domestic production, new karaoke (and new-old-stock) are still being produced and available to anyone with an internet connection. We don't need "karaoke equipment" or "domestic production" anymore.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
This of course doesn't mean that a host such as yourself with a quality product can't be successful.


Damn straight.

The Lone Ranger wrote:
All it means is it's harder to continue to compete with other forms of entertainment. There are still bands even though they are not as popular as they once were, there are still dj's, and many more activities. They are all going after, however, the same economic entertainment pie and the karaoke slice is getting smaller. The pressure is on if you are serious about trying to make hosting your sole source of income.


"Harder"? I would say that is entirely subjective. The OP describes a scenario where the "state of the karaoke industry" isn't exactly relative to the difficulties he encountered. Around these parts, the other forms of entertainment have to consider that they are competing against karaoke. I've carved myself a nice hunk of the pie and and the only pressure is for me to eat the whole thing by myself. :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 12:00 pm 
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8) Eat and enjoy for as long as it lasts. The trend is always your friend. I still haven't seen any hard data that indicates anything other than the karaoke industry has been in a state of decline over the last several years and will continue to struggle at least until 2022. That market share has shrunk in relation to other forms of entertainment. If a host is still successful then he or she is bucking the trend line. Like anything else there will be winners and losers, as in the economy as a whole. It would make one think twice about getting into hosting at this stage of the market life cycle. I'm sure there are several hosts out there that think they might have gone into a different line of work.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:10 pm 
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The only decline I see in the karaoke industry are the quality of "KJ HOSTS" after all... the host does make or break the show.

Karaoke will live on for many decades to come.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:45 pm 
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There are just so many things competing for your entertainment dollars today!

The venue and KJ clearly have the biggest roles in the experience any patron receives, and given the serious lack of talent and professionalism I've witnessed at numerous karaoke events and venues (west central Florida) it comes as no surprise to me it's on the downhill slope!

I think that the KJ's who post on this forum are more interested and engaged professionals, and represent the higher end of the spectrum. Unfortunately you all are outnumbered by hacks and drunks who are only there to party for $50 and drinks, and sound like hammered crap to boot!


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:08 am 
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The subtext hidden in this thread is that some of us are talking about very different things. "Karaoke" from the perspective of hosts and pros (most of us writing here) is a business with declining profits. But "karaoke" as a social phenomenon or personal pursuit is undoubtedly more successful today than ever, engaged in by many times more people world-wide than us first-generation karaoke fans could have dreamed of 25 years ago.

What's ironic is that the business and the culture have diverged and headed in two separate directions, purely as a result of changes in the technology. And probably everyone who is not a KJ (or I should say not a legal KJ) considers it an overall improvement. I think it's very, very safe to say karaoke as a pursuit of self-entertainment will never die as long as our civilization lasts.

The old model, where karaoke was controlled entirely by a small handful of manufacturers, highly-invested hosts, and adventuresome bars, is deader than the dodo. It's been dying since someone copied the first CDG on their home computer or bought a mass-market CDG player to use at home. Yet there are more karaoke songs to sing, more places and ways to sing them, and more people singing them than ever.

Look at the rate the current manufacturers are turning out tracks: Zoom, Sunfly, KV especially, SBI in all it's forms, and now we fortunately have karaoke.net as well. Perhaps the only way to measure the success rate of karaoke in some kind of objective way are the sales of all those paid downloads. If a lot of money wasn't going to karaoke, those tracks wouldn't be getting made. It's just a smaller percentage going to the hosts these days, so of course some of us feel like something has died.


Last edited by Elementary Penguin on Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:10 am 
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Last nigth I drove over and retrieved the rest of my gear. While I was there, the lady who has self appointed herself as "manager", point blank said, "we have had complaints about karaoke"... well DUH!!!!! No matter what you do, someone will be complaining about something. That is life at the bar. She thinks that karaoke is to blame for the lack of business. I told her that unless something drastic changes at the bar, that she and everyone there should be looking for work elsewhere. She hinted that she has papers ready to sign that she will be buying the bar. Little does she suspect that "she" is the problem with the bar in the first place. Single handedly she has been the problem from the first. There are not many people who like her, nor her out-of-control boyfriend. I am not denying that karaoke may not be liked by everyone, and that some get annoyed with some of the singers and song choices, or how loud it is, or whatever they want to get annoyed by. But they do like me personally, and I like them in return. I show them respect and give them all the exact same personal attention that I would want myself. However, the lady who appointed herself 'queen' does the exact opposite. OH well, I guess they have chosen which bed to sleep in, so it's no longer my problem.

I am not going to miss the drama and headaches one little bit.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:43 am 
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mrscott wrote:
Last nigth I drove over and retrieved the rest of my gear. While I was there, the lady who has self appointed herself as "manager", point blank said, "we have had complaints about karaoke"... well DUH!!!!! No matter what you do, someone will be complaining about something. That is life at the bar. She thinks that karaoke is to blame for the lack of business. I told her that unless something drastic changes at the bar, that she and everyone there should be looking for work elsewhere. She hinted that she has papers ready to sign that she will be buying the bar. Little does she suspect that "she" is the problem with the bar in the first place. Single handedly she has been the problem from the first. There are not many people who like her, nor her out-of-control boyfriend. I am not denying that karaoke may not be liked by everyone, and that some get annoyed with some of the singers and song choices, or how loud it is, or whatever they want to get annoyed by. But they do like me personally, and I like them in return. I show them respect and give them all the exact same personal attention that I would want myself. However, the lady who appointed herself 'queen' does the exact opposite. OH well, I guess they have chosen which bed to sleep in, so it's no longer my problem.

I am not going to miss the drama and headaches one little bit.


8) First of all you have retired, so why is she bothering you about karaoke? If you a quitting isn't her problem solved? If she is buying a failing business that doesn't say much about her abilities anyway. If she is part of the problem, and she doesn't change which seems most likely, it would be better if she found a different job rather than to go in business for herself. I think the truth is Mr.Scott she doesn't have a clue about what to do with this bar, and was trying to get some feedback from you. I hope since you didn't have any skin in the game tell her the truth, that both her and her boyfriend are part of the overall decline of this particular business. Good luck to you and a bright future.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:56 am 
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karaokeniagarafalls wrote:
The only decline I see in the karaoke industry are the quality of "KJ HOSTS" after all... the host does make or break the show.

Karaoke will live on for many decades to come.



8) I think that you can divide the karaoke service business from the at home market side of the industry. While karaoke is still popular, patrons have greater options about how they get their karaoke fix. Technology has had a huge impact on the karaoke industry, and more people are basing their entertainment in a home environment setting than ever before. The home market is very important since it was the collapse of that segment of the market, that led to the downfall of most of the domestic manus. It was only the legal hosts that were keeping manus in business and that wasn't enough to make their operation cost effective. Karaoke will still live for many decades, it's just not going to be profitable for the karaoke hosting end of the industry. This has come about for many reasons that have been stated before. While karaoke lives the Golden Era of the host is drawing to a close.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:11 am 
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The Lone Ranger wrote:
mrscott wrote:
Last nigth I drove over and retrieved the rest of my gear. While I was there, the lady who has self appointed herself as "manager", point blank said, "we have had complaints about karaoke"... well DUH!!!!! No matter what you do, someone will be complaining about something. That is life at the bar. She thinks that karaoke is to blame for the lack of business. I told her that unless something drastic changes at the bar, that she and everyone there should be looking for work elsewhere. She hinted that she has papers ready to sign that she will be buying the bar. Little does she suspect that "she" is the problem with the bar in the first place. Single handedly she has been the problem from the first. There are not many people who like her, nor her out-of-control boyfriend. I am not denying that karaoke may not be liked by everyone, and that some get annoyed with some of the singers and song choices, or how loud it is, or whatever they want to get annoyed by. But they do like me personally, and I like them in return. I show them respect and give them all the exact same personal attention that I would want myself. However, the lady who appointed herself 'queen' does the exact opposite. OH well, I guess they have chosen which bed to sleep in, so it's no longer my problem.

I am not going to miss the drama and headaches one little bit.


8) First of all you have retired, so why is she bothering you about karaoke? If you a quitting isn't her problem solved? If she is buying a failing business that doesn't say much about her abilities anyway. If she is part of the problem, and she doesn't change which seems most likely, it would be better if she found a different job rather than to go in business for herself. I think the truth is Mr.Scott she doesn't have a clue about what to do with this bar, and was trying to get some feedback from you. I hope since you didn't have any skin in the game tell her the truth, that both her and her boyfriend are part of the overall decline of this particular business. Good luck to you and a bright future.


Thank you Lone Ranger. I am in total agreement with you. But I will let her find out the hard way. Although she still will put the blame on every other thing for her own failures. I know I was not perfect, and I could and should have done a better job of hosting,, but all that is moot now. So, for me, "yep" I am going to enjoy my new found future :)


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:33 am 
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In 13.5 years as a karaoke host, I think my discs, Compuhost, and my book-making software were the only "karaoke equipment" I owned. Everything else was live music gear, which does not seem to be tracked in those stats.

And again, I remember the mythical "peak" of karaoke in my town circa 2003-2005, and it was about 12-15 karaoke bars with about 3 total hosts in town all making $200+ a night at shows that were packed to the gills every night before the KJ ever walked in. Patrons all owned their own discs and at least 2-3 patrons at every show had a binder with quite the selection.

Now, about 60+ karaoke bars with about 40 total hosts around town making about $100-125 a night with some on nights, some off nights. Patrons still have their own music, but it's all digital and they share with each other or buy a craigslist harddrive. I don't know any patrons that still buy their own discs.

I can't provide statistics, but I think even though any given bar is not packing them in, there are more hosts than ever, more karaoke bars than ever, more total karaoke patrons than ever in my town. It just doesn't seem like it because of the insane saturation. I can't go a mile without passing a bar that has karaoke. And there may have been about 40+ live music venues 15 years ago, now there are about 10. Karaoke took over many of them.

Still contending that lower KJ wages and lower attendance at any given bar don't really indicate that much to the health of the overall market. There are a metric sh**ton of karaoke venues and KJs in the country right now. That's a good economic indicator for the industry.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 8:05 am 
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TopherM wrote:
In 13.5 years as a karaoke host, I think my discs, Compuhost, and my book-making software were the only "karaoke equipment" I owned. Everything else was live music gear, which does not seem to be tracked in those stats.

And again, I remember the mythical "peak" of karaoke in my town circa 2003-2005, and it was about 12-15 karaoke bars with about 3 total hosts in town all making $200+ a night at shows that were packed to the gills every night before the KJ ever walked in. Patrons all owned their own discs and at least 2-3 patrons at every show had a binder with quite the selection.

Now, about 60+ karaoke bars with about 40 total hosts around town making about $100-125 a night with some on nights, some off nights. Patrons still have their own music, but it's all digital and they share with each other or buy a craigslist harddrive. I don't know any patrons that still buy their own discs.

I can't provide statistics, but I think even though any given bar is not packing them in, there are more hosts than ever, more karaoke bars than ever, more total karaoke patrons than ever in my town. It just doesn't seem like it because of the insane saturation. I can't go a mile without passing a bar that has karaoke. And there may have been about 40+ live music venues 15 years ago, now there are about 10. Karaoke took over many of them.

Still contending that lower KJ wages and lower attendance at any given bar don't really indicate that much to the health of the overall market. There are a metric sh**ton of karaoke venues and KJs in the country right now. That's a good economic indicator for the industry.



8) What you are describing TopherM, is what you have stated before, basic supply and demand principles. Couple this with tight profit margins for most venues and yes Karaoke is the most cost effective form of entertainment. Especially when you compare it with live music, where you have to pay for a more expensive band. The number of bars in your area seems to have increased 75%, are there 75% more customers? Also if there are 40 hosts and over 60 bars with karaoke, how does the 20 bars without hosts supply their karaoke service? If there are an over supply of bars and and under supply of hosts shouldn't the hosts wages be rising instead of falling? Also you have to remember this is in your particular area and may not be the case in other parts of the country.

P.S. Thinking about it the 60+ bars might not be having karaoke on the same night and one or more of the hosts could be doing more than one gig a week, that could make the difference as far as the more bars vs. hosts numbers indicate. Remember I never said karaoke is dying or that it is dead, it is just moving away from it's peak and is in the decline phase in it's economic market life cycle. It will continue to be in decline until 2022 at least. The way you have laid things out unless there is a dramatic increase in the number of patrons all that is being done is more players are dividing the same economic pie, with smaller pieces for each. The contraction of the industry after the financial meltdown of 2008 has never actually been recovered. Also the disposable income of patrons have been reduced over the last few years, and has not increased to before meltdown levels.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 4:40 pm 
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As a slightly more optimistic note than what I covered earlier, while hosts have gotten a smaller and smaller slice of the pie in the last dozen years, I don't think we can ever go fully extinct either. While the number of people who got out to sing in bars is a smaller percentage of karaoke than it used to be, it's a smaller percentage of a bigger and probably still growing overall number. There will always be a piece of the customer base that wants that thrill of live performance, and they crave that audience, so there will always be a need for at least some bar-based karaoke run by pro hosts.

Where we used to own 100% of this customer market (because the only place to experience karaoke was in a bar with a host using their own laser discs or cdg's), it was 100% of a very tiny market in the beginning. Only getting 10% of the market today would equal the same profits if the overall base was 10 times bigger. The actual numbers are probably all a lot bigger (and percentage-wise, smaller) than a factor of 10 though.

There is a vastly larger number of karaoke fans to tap into than ever before, but we as a profession aren't tapping into them enough to make the money we want. We need to encourage those home users to come out more to do what we consider "real karaoke", singing to a real live audience. It's already been said here by everyone in another context, the context of fighting piracy, but all we can do is offer the highest quality, user-friendly shows possible. There's a lot of small tweeks we can try, but no magic wand any of us have discovered... yet.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:24 am 
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8) There is no magic wand because the industry is just a reflection of changes that have occurred in America over the last several decades. We have a situation where the distance between haves and citizens struggling has gotten wider. Everyone is trying to figure out how to deal with the new realities of a changing society and nobody has quite got a handle on it. We live in an information age and many of us have old skills that are no longer in demand like they once were. That is why you have so many displaced workers in this country. Education and retraining are needed by everyone to fill the jobs that remain vacant. The trouble is many older workers have a hard time making the switch. If our industry is a reflection of the nation as a whole, then the same forces that rock every body's small boat rocks ours as well. No host is an island. I don't see an improvement in the industry until the overall economic health of this country is restored, if it ever can be?


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2017 1:52 pm 
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great posts all around

i don't think karaoke is dying

it all comes down to the host and the show itself, if you ask me

i think karaoke is on cruise control for the moment, though


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:15 am 
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In SW Florida my crowds have been growing. Not only are they growing but they are becoming more consistent all year, and not just during snowbird season.

The Boomers are my saving grace :D


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