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 Post subject: Booked my first wedding
PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:19 am 
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I've only been KJing and DJing for about a year, mostly private parties and reunions or at my own restaurant, I recently booked a wedding for the first time, any suggestions or tips on how to make it a success ?

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:42 am 
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southernsounds4u wrote:
I've only been KJing and DJing for about a year, mostly private parties and reunions or at my own restaurant, I recently booked a wedding for the first time, any suggestions or tips on how to make it a success ?

Find a wedding DJ and shadow for a couple of weddings if you can.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 9:09 am 
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Be prepared to encounter a "bridezilla". The bride and groom will have tons of song requests of which most will be a total flop on making it a fun day for all.... not just the B&G. Let them give you the schedule of "whats and whens". Anything you do on your own will probably be wrong. Good Luck!!!!!!

I will never do another wedding.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 9:13 am 
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Go to briansredd on you tube. He vloges about wedding DJing. He's been a wedding DJ for some 20 years. lots of great tips and stuff.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 4:14 pm 
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mrmarog wrote:
Be prepared to encounter a "bridezilla". The bride and groom will have tons of song requests of which most will be a total flop on making it a fun day for all.... not just the B&G. Let them give you the schedule of "whats and whens". Anything you do on your own will probably be wrong. Good Luck!!!!!!

I will never do another wedding.


While I was always concerned about encountering a "bridezilla" I was fortunate enough to have not encountered one...or maybe it was all the prep work and meeting with the bride and groom to be 2-3 times prior to the wedding that prevented that chance encounter.
I also used a wedding reception worksheet, filled out by the bride and groom to be, which helped immensly with an outline and expectations for the reception.
My bride's and groom's were always very pleased with my DJing job and all tipped very generously for a job well done.
Wedding receptions will NEVER go as planned or as thought should by the bride & groom...this is gauranteed! They will go the way they go and your primary job is to keep the dance floor full.
Putting together a playlist ahead of time is a good idea but you cannot just play a playlist, you will have to adapt (read the crowd). You also have to be cognizant about which songs NOT to play.
Be very carefull about promising to play requests...80% of the guest song requests I would get would be gauranteed dance floor killers...songs that only the requester wanted to hear and would do nothing for the dance floor.

Unfortunately it was the venues that drove me crazy and the last one that caused me to say I would never do another wedding again.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 5:55 pm 
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In my experience it has always been a bridesmaidzilla, drunk friend of the groom, or sibling of the BorG who was the royal pain in the (@$%&#!).

Let them know beforehand that they need to pick one person and all deviations from the plan have to go through that person.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2016 7:01 pm 
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1) Ask for a favorite songs playlist to be played and don't forget to pre-listen to those special songs (Bride/groom song, Father/bride song, wedding party song, Bachelor Surprise under dress song) Also request A DO NOT PLAY LIST. Trust me on this one. The wrong song can ruin a brides day.

2) Take a 50% Non-Refundable deposit 3-6 months before wedding.

3) Don't go cheap. It's the brides special day so give her the best of what they pay for. $300 is too cheap. but $1000 for Both Stag n Doe / and wedding reception is an easy sale.

4) Brides special day, make sure you have her favorite color in your lighting pattern.

5) Have karaoke available (Just in case they request to sing)

6) Cordless mic to pass around at the Wedding party table.

7) A basic coarse on how to Properly MC will earn many brownie points.

8 ) Business cards. Don't forget to bring at least 5-10 business cards and place then right next to your system.

9) Set your future wedding shows 3 - 6 months in advance (Many weddings get called off suddenly) At same time don't make yourself instantly available... it will give the person a wrong impression.

10) MC's are easy to find (Best friends of the groom always make the best MC's. also kids like to talk it up n the mic. give them the opportunity. They may be our future in the business.

Give me a Like or Thumbs up if these help.

Cheers!!!


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2016 3:45 am 
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Can any of you recommend a good CD to buy for weddings ? or is there one ?

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2016 10:03 am 
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If you're talking the wedding itself vs the reception you need the usual stuff that turns up on almost any wedding disk on Amazon...

Pachelbel's Canon, Wedding March from Lohengrin, Sheep May Safely Graze, etc.

Good luck. Try to get ahold of the photographer before hand and get on the same page with him or her.

They can really screw things up, because I've had the father daughter dance cued and ready and the next thing I know the photographer is pulling the bride and groom over to the cake because she's in a hurry to get home.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2016 11:07 am 
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http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chauvet-DJ-GigB ... SwYlJW3ZuP

Does anyone or has anyone used these lights ?

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2016 8:31 pm 
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Man, you're opening a whole new can of worms and expense, when you get into lighting. Chauvet makes a great product (top of the line for price range and quality) but if you're looking at the gig bar lit, you'd be better off with the full Gig Bar. For $100 more you'll get a lot more options. Problem is that if you're in a room of any size one won't be enough, you'll need at least two not to mention a good fogger (Chauvet 1300 or better) or a good Hazer (Chauvet Haze 2D or 3D) to make them effective and let's not even begin to talk about the difference a couple of moving heads can make. :o

With tripod type stands you will also need sandbags to keep them from falling over (I found out the hard way and I knew better) and they're easy to torc (sp?) which will cause instability. So you will eventually incur the cost of "Real" Truss and the time and effort to set and strike, of course lighting should defiantly be a major bump in your rate when included.

KarenB

Here's a link for the full gig bar.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CHAUVET-DJ-GigB ... SwBLlVdx0z


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 28, 2016 9:50 pm 
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I get a lot of weddings, and I still stress over them. I think of it this way: the photographer gets to go home and edit what he or she did that day. You have no such luck - everything is live and on the spot.

A few things others have said: listen to every special song requested. Last thing you want is an ill-timed skip, or to find out it's a tinny live recording. Create a worksheet for the b&g to fill out, and bring copies. And remember, more than anyone else, you're controlling the pace of the reception. I, for my part, encourage every client to allow me to load up on as much specialty stuff as possible right up front - meaning, entrances, toasts, and special dances happen right away and then we all get to relax until cake.

Introduce yourself to the other vendors - photographer, videographer, etc. - and work WITH them, not against them. Chances are you'll all bond over a hastily-scarfed vendor meal eventually anyway - and you'll probably all hate the venue staff anyway, so you'll have that in common.

If it's an unfamiliar venue, make sure you have a gameplan. Scope out the joint well ahead of time or make plans to be there very early.

I, too, have been fortunate enough to never have to deal with an actual bridezilla (knock on wood, of course), BUT I've dealt with something just as bad - her family and friends. Remember, above all, that the bride and groom hired you to do a job. Make sure guests know that their requests are not as important as the b&g's must-plays. Bride wants to dance to Paul Simon's "Obvious Child", and groom wants to rock out to "First Date" by Blink-182, but they both adamantly don't want the Cupid Shuffle to make an appearance? That's what you do. And when a guest asks for the Cupid shuffle - and, God help you, they WILL, that's a hard-and-fast wedding certainty these days - you have to explain that the people that cut you a check have said no, so it's a firm no. (I use these examples because my wedding last night explicitly laid out those very terms in the wedding worksheet.) Sometimes people WILL NOT be cool with that, and you'll have to find a polite but firm way to say "sucks to be you".

Oh, and if you're MCing, get pronunciations of key names and practice them. I once DJed a wedding where the bride and her family were over from Finland - lots of names that required lots of intricate pronunciation. You don't want to do that on the fly!

And, hey, if you do make a mistake, fumbling over a name or something silly (I once introduced the maid of honor into the reception as "best man Katie Whatever")... just play it off. My tactic is to draw attention to my own mistake in a good-natured but self-deprecating way - it's usually endearing, not that it happens that frequently or anything. (Shut up, tiny voice in my head reminding me that I called the best man "Joe" instead of "Jon" last night.)

Also, most people will tell you not to drink. I disagree. Have a damn drink. Nobody wants a hammered DJ, but if you're slightly loose, you're a lot more charming to that crowd. They can sense when you're stiff. (Not like that. Come on, you know what I mean.)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 4:00 am 
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andrew3000 wrote:
I get a lot of weddings, and I still stress over them. I think of it this way: the photographer gets to go home and edit what he or she did that day. You have no such luck - everything is live and on the spot.

A few things others have said: listen to every special song requested. Last thing you want is an ill-timed skip, or to find out it's a tinny live recording. Create a worksheet for the b&g to fill out, and bring copies. And remember, more than anyone else, you're controlling the pace of the reception. I, for my part, encourage every client to allow me to load up on as much specialty stuff as possible right up front - meaning, entrances, toasts, and special dances happen right away and then we all get to relax until cake.

Introduce yourself to the other vendors - photographer, videographer, etc. - and work WITH them, not against them. Chances are you'll all bond over a hastily-scarfed vendor meal eventually anyway - and you'll probably all hate the venue staff anyway, so you'll have that in common.

If it's an unfamiliar venue, make sure you have a gameplan. Scope out the joint well ahead of time or make plans to be there very early.

I, too, have been fortunate enough to never have to deal with an actual bridezilla (knock on wood, of course), BUT I've dealt with something just as bad - her family and friends. Remember, above all, that the bride and groom hired you to do a job. Make sure guests know that their requests are not as important as the b&g's must-plays. Bride wants to dance to Paul Simon's "Obvious Child", and groom wants to rock out to "First Date" by Blink-182, but they both adamantly don't want the Cupid Shuffle to make an appearance? That's what you do. And when a guest asks for the Cupid shuffle - and, God help you, they WILL, that's a hard-and-fast wedding certainty these days - you have to explain that the people that cut you a check have said no, so it's a firm no. (I use these examples because my wedding last night explicitly laid out those very terms in the wedding worksheet.) Sometimes people WILL NOT be cool with that, and you'll have to find a polite but firm way to say "sucks to be you".

Oh, and if you're MCing, get pronunciations of key names and practice them. I once DJed a wedding where the bride and her family were over from Finland - lots of names that required lots of intricate pronunciation. You don't want to do that on the fly!

And, hey, if you do make a mistake, fumbling over a name or something silly (I once introduced the maid of honor into the reception as "best man Katie Whatever")... just play it off. My tactic is to draw attention to my own mistake in a good-natured but self-deprecating way - it's usually endearing, not that it happens that frequently or anything. (Shut up, tiny voice in my head reminding me that I called the best man "Joe" instead of "Jon" last night.)

Also, most people will tell you not to drink. I disagree. Have a damn drink. Nobody wants a hammered DJ, but if you're slightly loose, you're a lot more charming to that crowd. They can sense when you're stiff. (Not like that. Come on, you know what I mean.)


I believe I will have a drink, lol. Never been one to be nervous but I am about this wedding, its at a huge venue.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 4:25 am 
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KarenB wrote:
Man, you're opening a whole new can of worms and expense, when you get into lighting. Chauvet makes a great product (top of the line for price range and quality) but if you're looking at the gig bar lit, you'd be better off with the full Gig Bar. For $100 more you'll get a lot more options. Problem is that if you're in a room of any size one won't be enough, you'll need at least two not to mention a good fogger (Chauvet 1300 or better) or a good Hazer (Chauvet Haze 2D or 3D) to make them effective and let's not even begin to talk about the difference a couple of moving heads can make. :o

With tripod type stands you will also need sandbags to keep them from falling over (I found out the hard way and I knew better) and they're easy to torc (sp?) which will cause instability. So you will eventually incur the cost of "Real" Truss and the time and effort to set and strike, of course lighting should defiantly be a major bump in your rate when included.


I was planning on getting two of the other ones, whats the big difference between these
KarenB

Here's a link for the full gig bar.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CHAUVET-DJ-GigB ... SwBLlVdx0z

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 7:16 am 
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Make sure you have all of this music at a minimum! Mobile Beat compiles the most requested songs from their network of tens of thousands of DJs.

http://www.mobilebeat.com/top-200/

You really shouldn't just play the whole songs, you should set cue points where the beat comes in and play the songs from that point. No one wants to hear intros and outros at a party. Virtual DJ is free for basic playback function and cueing. If you don't already have a DJ program with this ability, get the free version of Virtual DJ 8.

PLAN PLAN PLAN. Most weddings don't have "wedding planners" anymore, and a good chunk of that duty is up to the DJ! Make sure you have a solid agenda for every event along with what song is to be played and times. Note to the bride/grrom that the times will just be a guideline, as nothing is going to run on time, but it is usually the DJ's responsibility to track everyone down and make sure they are ready for the next event (cake cutting, toasts, etc.).

Introductions is probably the hardest part of the whole gig. Make sure you have everyone's name written down phonetically if they are even slightly unusual. Nothing starts off a wedding reception on a bad note faster than mispronouncing the maid of honor's last name!

Have fun!

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 8:08 am 
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man i can't stress this enough, the wedding march or whatever the song is the bride wants to walk down to is the most important song of the wedding!

make sure it's que'd up and ready to go and setup up with the bride or the mother of the bride with a visual que to start the music that way they think they are controlling the most important part of the wedding.

nothing like having to give a refund because you ruined the biggest moment of the brides life!

fortunately for me i have never messed this up yet and hope i never do. and if I did, the wedding would not cost more then the non refundable deposit already paid (I require a 50% deposit). It should be your #1 thing to focus on for the night. the rest of the wedding is cake work and easy money.

you need to have a sit down with the bride and groom. ask what their expectations are of you the host. and talk about times, playlists for special dances like bride/groom, mother/son, Father/daughter, and about MC'ing (announcements and introduction of the newly wedd's). I always suggest they do a dollar dance, most haven't heard of it and it makes them some great honeymoon cash. the more they expect from you, the host. will change the price range of your gig. you want to let them know what they are getting for what they are paying.

also ask the brides if a Tip basket is out of the question because you will always be asked "where's your tip jar". Most will say your getting plenty and don't need one. If they say it's ok then get a basket and line it with the wedding colors so it doesn't stick out like a big glass jar that says "Tips" on it does. but my experience is if you have one you'll make an extra couple hundo's. but make sure to ask first!!!! myself I'm in a small town and most of the weddings i do are for friends and they will just pass the hat around for me anyways. especially if they don't see a tip jar. one wedding i recently did i gave the family discount and didn't even ask to put a tip jar out. the grooms mother, i went to school with passed a basket around and got me almost a $350 tip. unexpected and I was very appreciative.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 9:37 am 
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I ask for a complete song list and work with the wedding party to make it a great list. I ask for the specific names of the people who can request songs during the reception. Otherwise the playlist is closed. I prefer if the wedding party uses a coordinator so we can work together on the reception progression. If there isn't a coordinator, I ask for who will work with me. I break the songs up into different lists. Special songs, dinner songs and dance music. I ask the party to prioritize if they make a huge list. This way the wedding party knows exactly what to expect.

Know your audience and know that audience will change as the event progresses. I like having a few selections from the 50s and 60s (Elvis type stuff) early in the reception (while people are eating) to make sure grand parents etc feel welcome. The volume level needs to be low after the wedding party entrance and until the first dances.

Be ready for anything. The last wedding I did a few weeks ago they had a bouquet the bride carried and one to be thrown. The bride threw the throw-able into some overhead drapes. HA! Everyone just froze looking up at the drapes. I ran over and grabbed the carry one and we put that one into play. The bride made the toss, then tries to use that one to get the first one down and got that one stuck too. Event staff saved the bouquets but thinking fast saved the day.

If the groom wants Led Zeppelin, play it for him. The groom came up and asked for some at this last wedding. I told him I didn't think there was a reception worthy Led Zeppelin song. I suggested Whole lotta love. Played it.. It was a huge hit. Grannies were on the dance floor playing the drum parts.

So that's how smart I am when it comes to weddings.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 10:43 am 
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I have done 3 weddings this summer more than I usually do. I keep trying to
get away from doing them but keep getting sucked back in.

3 months before - Have the bride & Groom fill out a reception planner.
It should include Dates and times, all venue info, names of the Wedding party, any special announcements
toasts, special dances, DJ attire, any special songs they want played or not played, A 50% non refundable deposit.

1 month before - Have a face to face meeting with the bride and groom. Find out what their expectations are. What kind of crowd to expect, young old mixed? Go over the whole planner make any changes. Find out who you will be working with, Them, a planner their family? Try to finalize a music list with them but remember you are the DJ and need to keep things moving. I cannot tell you how many times I got some pretty off the wall music lists from Grooms. Only to find myself surrounded by a diverse mixed young and older crowd. So be prepared with all types of music country, rock, pop, dance.

The day of - Be prepared do not wait until a few days before to get everything together. You should have already done this a couple of weeks ago. Show up early and pay attention to every detail that you should already have. Why be early? Sh*t happens leave yourself enough time to make any last minute corrections.

Now relax and do what you came prepared to do. If you prepare properly for a job it will go smooth.
Have fun and interact with the guests it will show through and everyone will have a good time.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2016 9:25 pm 
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KarenB wrote:
Man, you're opening a whole new can of worms and expense, when you get into lighting. Chauvet makes a great product (top of the line for price range and quality) but if you're looking at the gig bar lit, you'd be better off with the full Gig Bar. For $100 more you'll get a lot more options. Problem is that if you're in a room of any size one won't be enough, you'll need at least two not to mention a good fogger (Chauvet 1300 or better) or a good Hazer (Chauvet Haze 2D or 3D) to make them effective and let's not even begin to talk about the difference a couple of moving heads can make. :o

With tripod type stands you will also need sandbags to keep them from falling over (I found out the hard way and I knew better) and they're easy to torc (sp?) which will cause instability. So you will eventually incur the cost of "Real" Truss and the time and effort to set and strike, of course lighting should defiantly be a major bump in your rate when included.

KarenB

Here's a link for the full gig bar.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CHAUVET-DJ-GigB ... SwBLlVdx0z


Whenever you buy a package or "kit" of anything, it's never the same as if you put it together yourself. For example, the Mini Kinta, which can be had for around $90 dollars, blows away the included Derby lights of the Gig Bar. Step up to the Kinta FX, with built in laser and strobe, and you have a full light show. Use your own lighting tripod and you have a much better system that is sturdier and of better quality than the Gig Bar. Add a couple of LED pars or light bar if you want and you're set to go. This is a much better option in my opinion and offers more flexibility.

No, you don't get the foot switch or case that the Gig Bar comes with but the Kintas can be operated wirelessly from anywhere in the room by remote control. And if you shop wisely, you can probably put it all together for around the same price as the gig bar.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2016 1:30 am 
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Good luck, I hate doing karaoke at weddings. DJ is fine, will never do another karaoke wedding.

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